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The Pacer

How Scott Adams hypnotized himself

Sam Svoboda, Editor-in-Chief

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Dilbert creator Scott Adams has gained a sizable following recently for his blog posts on Trump and the general election. The angle he tackles the topic certainly is novel; he brands Trump as the “Master Persuader,” and predicts Trump will win the election due to his “superior persuasion skills.” Adams uses his “background” in persuasion and hypnosis (a background that, when scrutinized, looks a little more like a hobby) to lend ethos to these claims.

His blog posts started as an interesting, even necessary, second perspective on the general election. Over time, this has changed. His admiration of has Trump became more and more evident. Many blog posts deflect the argument that Trump is racist or inciting racism, despite that one time when he claimed, with absolutely no evidence, that President Obama was a Muslim born outside the United States. Many more scrutinize the health of Hillary Clinton, despite his self-admitted the fact that he has absolutely no expertise in the subject.

Adams, in fact, no longer pretends to be a detached commentator: he has recently endorsed Trump, citing, exclusively, Clinton’s support of an estate tax. You don’t have to be “trained in persuasion,” as Adams claims to be, to see that for the lie it is.

Even more ridiculous is Adam’s constant predictions for the general election, which he often changes but always have one consistent theme: Trump will win in a landslide, because of his superior persuasion powers. However, he’s not always so sure about that outcome. When Clinton surged in the pools, he tried to weasel out of this prediction.

Scott Adams constantly talks about how the public falls for confirmation bias, people living in bubbles, while that is exactly what he is doing. Living in a bubble where trump is not historically shady and offensive, and persuasion is more impressive than ethics.

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The online edition of the award-winning student newspaper at Rolling Meadows High School
How Scott Adams hypnotized himself